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Django Friday Tips: Inspecting ORM queries

Today lets look at the tools Django provides out of the box to debug the queries made to the database using the ORM.

This isn’t an uncommon task. Almost everyone who works on a non-trivial Django application faces situations where the ORM does not return the correct data or a particular operation as taking too long.

The best way to understand what is happening behind the scenes when you build database queries using your defined models, managers and querysets, is to look at the resulting SQL.

The standard way of doing this is to set the logging configuration to print all queries done by the ORM to the console. This way when you browse your website you can check them in real time. Here is an example config:

LOGGING = {
    ...
    'handlers': {
        'console': {
            'level': 'DEBUG',
            'filters': ['require_debug_true'],
            'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
        },
        ...
    },
    'loggers': {
        ...
        'django.db.backends': {
            'level': 'DEBUG',
            'handlers': ['console', ],
        },
    }
}

The result will be something like this:

...
web_1     | (0.001) SELECT MAX("axes_accessattempt"."failures_since_start") AS "failures_since_start__max" FROM "axes_accessattempt" WHERE ("axes_accessattempt"."ip_address" = '172.18.0.1'::inet AND "axes_accessattempt"."attempt_time" >= '2020-09-18T17:43:19.844650+00:00'::timestamptz); args=(Inet('172.18.0.1'), datetime.datetime(2020, 9, 18, 17, 43, 19, 844650, tzinfo=<UTC>))
web_1     | (0.001) SELECT MAX("axes_accessattempt"."failures_since_start") AS "failures_since_start__max" FROM "axes_accessattempt" WHERE ("axes_accessattempt"."ip_address" = '172.18.0.1'::inet AND "axes_accessattempt"."attempt_time" >= '2020-09-18T17:43:19.844650+00:00'::timestamptz); args=(Inet('172.18.0.1'), datetime.datetime(2020, 9, 18, 17, 43, 19, 844650, tzinfo=<UTC>))
web_1     | Bad Request: /users/login/
web_1     | [18/Sep/2020 18:43:20] "POST /users/login/ HTTP/1.1" 400 2687

Note: The console output will get a bit noisy

Now lets suppose this logging config is turned off by default (for example, in a staging server). You are manually debugging your app using the Django shell and doing some queries to inspect the resulting data. In this case str(queryset.query) is very helpful to check if the query you have built is the one you intended to. Here’s an example:

>>> box_qs = Box.objects.filter(expires_at__gt=timezone.now()).exclude(owner_id=10)
>>> str(box_qs.query)
'SELECT "boxes_box"."id", "boxes_box"."name", "boxes_box"."description", "boxes_box"."uuid", "boxes_box"."owner_id", "boxes_box"."created_at", "boxes_box"."updated_at", "boxes_box"."expires_at", "boxes_box"."status", "boxes_box"."max_messages", "boxes_box"."last_sent_at" FROM "boxes_box" WHERE ("boxes_box"."expires_at" > 2020-09-18 18:06:25.535802+00:00 AND NOT ("boxes_box"."owner_id" = 10))'

If the problem is related to performance, you can check the query plan to see if it hits the right indexes using the .explain() method, like you would normally do in SQL.

>>> print(box_qs.explain(verbose=True))
Seq Scan on public.boxes_box  (cost=0.00..13.00 rows=66 width=370)
  Output: id, name, description, uuid, owner_id, created_at, updated_at, expires_at, status, max_messages, last_sent_at
  Filter: ((boxes_box.expires_at > '2020-09-18 18:06:25.535802+00'::timestamp with time zone) AND (boxes_box.owner_id <> 10))

This is it, I hope you find it useful.

By Gonçalo Valério

Software developer and owner of this blog. More in the "about" page.

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